Philosophy of Liberty

Complete Liberty (Large Print Edition): The Demise of the State and the Rise of Voluntary America
LARGE PRINT EDITION! More at LargePrintLiberty.com

There’s not a single aspect of your life that’s not affected, either directly or indirectly, by politics. So, the purpose of this book is to provide you with a clear understanding of modern politics and the proper response to it—complete liberty. My first book on the general subject, The Psychology of Liberty, was a wide-ranging philosophical treatise and was considerably longer than this one. In contrast, you’ll find that Complete Liberty has a non-scholarly, conversational style. It’s designed for that special person in your life you want to persuade, which includes yourself. This person, for some good reason or another, isn’t interested in perusing long volumes on the fine details of libertarianism or vast tomes about the workings of free market economics. While those types of books certainly have their merits, here I aim to cut to the chase. We’ll discover what’s so special about the liberty that we humans have been missing all these years. “All these years” basically means since the time we began uttering words alongside our unfortunate Neanderthal cousins. Indeed, we’ve never experienced complete liberty as a species. Rather, we’ve continually experienced some form of oppression by groups of individuals who are interested in running our lives, making it seem as if no one has the right to live for one’s own sake. In modern times, these groups of people take the form of the State. (From the Preface.)
Anatomy of the State

Anatomy of the State

by Murray Rothbard
Murray Rothbard was known as the state's greatest living enemy, and this book is his most succinct and powerful statement on the topic. He explains what a state is and what it is not. He shows how it is an institution that violates all that we hold as honest and moral, and how it operates under a false cover. He shows how the state wrecks freedom, destroys civilization, and threatens all lives and property and social well being, all under the veneer of "good intentions."
Conceived in Liberty

Conceived in Liberty

by Murray N. Rothbard

The new single-volume edition of Conceived in Liberty is here! After so many years of having to juggle four volumes, the Mises Institute has finally put it altogether in a single, 1,616-page book. This makes it easier to read, and makes clearer just what a contribution this book is to the history of libertarian literature.

There's never been a better time to remember the revolutionary and even libertarian roots of the American founding, and there's no better guide to what this means in the narrative of the Colonial period than Murray Rothbard.

For anyone who thinks of Murray Rothbard as only an economic theorist or political thinker, this giant book is something of a surprise. It is probably his least known treatise. It offers a complete history of the Colonial period of American history, a period lost to students today, who are led to believe American history begins with the US Constitution.

Rothbard's ambition was to shed new light on Colonial history and show that the struggle for human liberty was the heart and soul of this land from its discovery through the culminating event of the American Revolution. These volumes are a tour de force, enough to establish Rothbard as one of the great American historians.

It is a detailed narrative history of the struggle between liberty and power, as we might expect, but it is more. Rothbard offers a third alternative to the conventional interpretive devices. Against those on the right who see the American Revolution as a "conservative" event, and those on the left who want to invoke it as some sort of proto-socialist uprising, Rothbard views this period as a time of accelerating libertarian radicalism. Through this prism, Rothbard illuminates events as never before.

The volumes were brought out in the 1970s, but the odd timing and uneven distribution prevented any kind of large audience. They were beloved only by a few specialists, and sought after by many thanks to their outstanding reputation. The Mises Institute is pleased to be the publisher of this integrated book.

This single volume covers the discovery of the Americas and the colonies in the 17th century, the period of "salutary neglect" in the first half of the 18th century, the advance to revolution, from 1760-1775 and the political, military, and ideological history of the revolution and after.

How to Be a Successful Tyrant (The Megalomaniac Manifesto)
Cartoon illustrations. "In a town that produces interesting people (Bryn Athyn), Larken Rose catapulted above the rest by challenging the federal government to refute his reading of the tax code and answer his questions before he would give them another dime. In 2002, he produced a video explaining his research and conclusions. The video sold briskly for several years until the government railroaded the 37-year-old upstart into federal prison. His Conclusions were never refuted. " "Before going to prison, Rose lived with his wifeTessa and daughter Elyssa in a modest homein Pennsylvania, where they count the days until he returns."
On Truth: The Tyranny of Illusion
From a short-term, merely practical standpoint, you really do not want to read this book. This book will mess up your life, as you know it. This book will change every single one of your relationships - most importantly, your relationship with yourself. This book will change your life even if you never implement a single one of the proposals it contains.

This book will change you even if you disagree with every single idea it puts forward. Even if you put it down right now, this book will have changed your life, because now you know that you are afraid of change.

We are born to truth, yet everywhere we are enmeshed in error. Superstition, irrationality and patriotism all work to cripple our natural affinities to rationality and empiricism.

This book, by Stefan Molyneux, host of Freedomain Radio, examines and explodes all the propaganda that stands between you and the simple truth of life, the universe and everything. All the truths that you were born with, that were scrubbed out of your mind for the profit and fun of your elders, will be reawakened in this short but powerful book.

Begin the process of reclaiming your own reason, pick up this book, hold on for the ride, and arrive at the truth.
Practical Anarchy: The Freedom of the Future
Imagine a world without government – this thought exercise seems impossible for many, because the power and reach of state monopolies is so omnipresent in our lives. However, there is no rational, economic or moral reason to assume that governments are necessary for the provision of roads, healthcare, charity, dispute resolution, courts, policing, national defense, jails – or any of the other services currently monopolized by the state.

Governments are extremely dangerous, responsible for over 250 million deaths in the 20th century alone – if it is possible to run a society without a government, surely this is something that we must strive towards as a species.

Practical Anarchy makes strong case for the private – that is to say voluntary – provision for public services. It reveals the idea of government as a dangerous and unnecessary anachronism, and points the way towards a peaceful and voluntary future for mankind.
Most Dangerous Superstition
Another fine book by Larken Rose.
The Law

The Law

by Frederic Bastiat
The Law was originally published in French in 1850 by Frederic Bastiat. It was written two years after the third French Revolution of 1848 and a few months before his death of tuberculosis at age 49. It is the work for which Bastiat is most famous. This translation to American English is from 1874.
For a New Liberty: The Libertarian Manifesto

For a New Liberty: The Libertarian Manifesto

by Murray N. Rothbard, Murray Rothbard

Pocket Edition!

This edition includes an introduction by Lew Rockwell.

In For a New Liberty: The Libertarian Manifesto, Rothbard proposes a once-and-for-all escape from the two major political parties, the ideologies they embrace, and their central plans for using state power against people. Libertarianism is Rothbard's radical alternative that says state power is unworkable and immoral and ought to be curbed and finally abolished.

To make his case, Rothbard deploys his entire system of thought: natural law, natural rights, Austrian economics, American history, the theory of the state, and more.

It is relentless, scientific, analytical, and morally energetic a book that makes an overwhelming case. Indeed, it gave an entire movement its intellectual consciousness and earned Rothbard the titles "Mr. Libertarian" and "The State's Greatest Living Enemy."

Society without the nation-state? Rothbard shows that this is the way for peace, prosperity, security, and freedom for all. In the entire history of libertarian ideas, no book has more successfully combined ideological rigor, theoretical exposition, political rhetoric, historical illustration, and strategic acumen. Rothbard poured a lifetime of research and all his intellectual energy into this project and he succeeded in writing a classic.

The book is the result of the only contract Rothbard ever received from a mainstream commercial publisher. He was asked to sum up the whole of the libertarian creed. Looking at the original manuscript, which was nearly complete after its first draft, it seems that it was a nearly effortless joy for him to write. It is seamless, unrelenting, and full of life.

He cut no corners and pulled no punches. It appeared in 1973 and created a whole movement that set out to crush the political monopoly.

From the day the book went out of print, the phone calls and emails started coming into our offices, hopeful of a new edition. Thanks to benefactors who have made it possible, this new edition from the Mises Institute is hardbound, beautiful, and affordable.

In subject after subject, this book is informative, bracing, and challenging. It also features the characteristically clear writing style for which Rothbard is famous, which stemmed from his organized thinking and passionate drive to teach and change the world.

The book begins with American history to show that the revolution of 1776 was the most libertarian of any in history. The pastors, pamphleteers, and statesmen who led it held that the state has no rights that the people themselves do not possess. They demanded full liberty, not some truncated version that existed in the old world. In this discussion, the reader comes to appreciate the founders of the United States of America as never before.

Rothbard then sets out to rekindle that fire, first through a discussion of the philosophy and ethics of freedom. The central axiom: no man or group of men may aggress against the person and property of anyone else. He justifies the axiom on the basis of natural rights. It is an axiom that has few opponents, until Rothbard spells out its implications: taxation is theft, conscription is slavery, and war is mass murder, among many other points.

Bracing indeed! But the state is the primary violator of this simple axiom. It presumes the right to rob and kill while purporting to protect us from robbing and killing. Thus follows a full theory of the state, how it gains and maintains controls over the population (but not through a social contract !), the various failed methods for keeping it in check (not even constitutions work!), its operations and tendencies to work its evil (it never has enough power), and how intellectuals become co-opted by the forces of state power.